National Parks

CAMPING IN THE NATIONAL Parks

I didn’t find a lot about National Parks. What I would suggest is to contact the state forestry service in the state you plan to camp. They can send you information on what they have to offer. The general information I obtain on the Internet is as follows.

Campsites are available on the first-come, first-served basis. All campsites accommodate tent camping. Campsites are available on a first come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Pets are allowed, but must be restrained or on a leash.

Camping Sites are large and separated by trees and bushes. All sites have a tent pad, picnic table and fire-ring, but no standing cooking unit. Some Sites are canoe in only - no vehicle access. Facilities are very primitive - nothing is provided. (This is not always the case)

National parks Trails are clearly marked to ensure your safety and protect the natural resources. Please Fort Davidson is at the center of what remains of the battlefield, and it reminds us of the sacrifices made by Missouri's citizens during the Civil War. See http://www.mostateparks.com/ftdavidson/preamble.htm for more information on Fort Davidson and the battle that was so valiantly fought there. Fortunately, my hammock setup and insulation kept me warm enough. Warm enough, in fact, that I got back into my hammock and slept another couple of hours.

Pets have to be on leashes in the campgrounds. Most people are totally understanding and love to see dogs running around and enjoying themselves, other people who aren’t animal lovers tend to give you the evil eye if your dog isn’t on a tight leash. Pets must always be restrained or on a leash while in developed recreation sites and on trails. Pets (except guide dogs) are not allowed in swimming areas.

Fishing is permitted. Along a national recreation water trail near Big Springs (five miles long), moose, trumpeter swans, ospreys and bald eagles often can be seen, and an excellent 3 to five-hour canoe/float trip can be taken. Fishing for salmon and steelhead during the fall and early winter months is considered the finest in California. Hunting in Six Rivers, county is primarily for Columbian blacktail deer, black bear, blue grouse, and valley and mountain quail.



National Parks