Camping Food


            
                    Dehydrated/freeze-dried camping food is great for hiking, backpacking, or camping meals because you don't have to keep it cold to avoid spoiling.

    While coolers/refrigerators can work well in some situations, ice or electricity isn't always available making dehydrated/freeze dried food very attractive. While removing the water helps preserve camping food it also has another benefit...

    Camping, backpacking, or hiking food that's freeze-dried or dehydrated can reduce weight by sixty to ninety percent. If you're carrying a backpack or other hiking gear with a few days worth of camping food and supplies this can make a BIG difference.

    As with any prepackaged food you'll probably find most camping food portion/serving sizes extremely optimistic or after a long day of hiking...laughable. I'm not sure who dreamed up the system but keep it in mind when you're buying it because otherwise you'll probably be going hungry, or if you're carrying a pack all day you might even be undernourished.

    Something else to keep in mind is the design of the container itself. The containers with corners can make it difficult for the boiling water to mix with the camping food leaving dry spots. Also tall narrow containers make it almost impossible to reach inside with a spoon without getting as messy as a two year-old, as you work your way down to the bottom. (A quick fix is to trim off the top as you eat.) And if you're a light eater or use them afterwards for trash some of the containers have a "ziplock" type of closure which can come in handy, if they're not trimmed to ribbons. ;-)

    Some camping foods can now be heated with a heating pouch by adding water to a chemical heating source. The advantage is there's no flame. The drawback is they weigh more than the pouch by itself and there's more trash to dispose of properly. So it may be better to just bring a small stove if you're backpacking.

    Camping food offers tradeoffs. While it isn't usually gourmet that doesn't mean it has to be bad. After all a gourmet meal would make for a lot of extra weight and inconvenience. Not my idea of a fun trip. The reason people buy it is because it's light, convenient, and it can provide a quick hot meal. As for taste...

    If you'd like more information on camping food please click here for the complete article. Also you may want to take a look at a related article on camping stove performance, ease-of-use & what to avoid.

            
            
                    Marc Wiltse learned how important good quality hiking equipment and camping gear were after his pup tent flooded with over 3 inches of water forcing him to sleep in the front seat of his 2-seat Honda CRX (translation: research is a good thing). His hiking equipment & camping gear guides & reviews save you time & money. Subscribe to his camping & hiking newsletter & get the most usable information FREE! © Marc Wiltse. Reprint permission if author, copyright, links & this notice are intact.

            

        
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Glamping is a portmanteau of glamour and camping and describes a style of camping with amenities and, in some cases, resort-style services not usually associated with "traditional" camping. Glamping has become particularly popular with 21st century tourists seeking the luxuries of hotel accommodation alongside the escapism and adventure recreation of camping
Glamping has its roots in the early 1900s European and American safaris in Africa. Wealthy travellers accustomed to comfort and luxury did not want to sacrifice either, and their campsites and pampered wilderness lifestyles reflected it. Glamping is its modern equivalent, combining both yesterday's amenities and today's technology. Also called boutique camping, luxury camping, posh camping, or comfy camping, today's glamping features such structures as yurts, tipis, pods, bell tents, safari tents, tent cabins, and tree houses.[5] Glampsites range in price from as little as $50 per night to thousands of dollars per night, depending on amenities, which can include fresh bed linens, en suite washrooms, food service, and private verandas. Concept Glamping can exist on its own or encroach on traditional forms. In mid-2014, the City Manager of Black Rock City, Nevada described Burning Man, an annual event at nearby Black Rock Desert, as having "jumped the shark," when the 2014 event — which had been previously noted for core values of radical self-expression and self-reliance — featured incongruously posh VIP lounges, cell phone towers, and private jets.